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20130126
20130126
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
it clear while we don't have jurisdiction over religion in the same way we don't over sexual orientation, what we're seeing in all of these -- and all of these are case by case, you can't just broad sweep the laws -- when students are bullied and harassed in this world because of religion, in most instances a lot of that is not about race or religion, it's because. perception that students that share certain religious traits also share certain ethnicities and that is discrimination and that falls under title 6. it is not just about enforcing the laws that make it clear how the laws apply. it is, though, as we said, you can't get at this through enforcement alone. this is a culture that tolerates this and in too many ways promotes it. as tom mentioned we have an unprecedented partnership not just between our agencies but agencies across the federal government that the president has convened to bring our best resources and minds to bear to do something about it. there is now a web site, stopbullying.gov where a tool kit is being developed and these kinds of best practices are being promo
religious does not just mean that you be religious on sundays. we have privatized religion to such a great extent here. some of us may be obsessed about this issue. we talk about freedom and religious freedom and conscience -- my sense is most of america has no idea what we are talking about. i think we have different senses of what freedom is. maybe freedom means increased access to contraception. how do we get a common vocabulary again? >> that is a great question. on the freedom of conscience and religious liberty, that was about a year ago as well, i think the left really feared that percolating. that is why they turned into an argument about contraception. i have to out fear your fear. i have to out celebrity your liberty. -- out-liberty your liberty. if we start each sentence with a question -- is it fair that the government, and then fill in the blank with anything you want. worshipu you can't your god. else you that you can't send your kid to a better school. is it fair that the government tells you that you can't run that business? basically, it is what they do without saying it.
religion, but particularly islam, there's not always a clear understanding to what the first amendment guarantees, which is the right to teach about a religion but not proselytize about it. i think there's fear of associating with anyone associated with islam. there are events outside our control that creates more interest and unfortunately also makes people more afraid. one of the programs we are about to launch is putting all our content online so a teacher in north dakota where there are no muslim, potentially, no expert can come to her classroom, they can go to our web site and download the content and teach the things we are teaching. >> i think partnerships are the best way to overcome the limitations because we all have limitations. and sometimes it's just visibility. we actually have on our web site 50 short films and one of them is a muslim student from a school in fremont going to a school in arinda talking about what it's like going to school as a muslim in the united states and they are asking questions and you see we are all kids in school and we have more similaritie
. >> and this union between religion and the state that we know has, you know, for a long time, church and state combined to keep -- to make contraceptives obscene. how do you explain this religious determinism on the part of so many opponents of abortion? >> well, there's sort of two ways of looking at it. i mean, many people don't know that abortion became criminalized in the united states not as a result of really a religious movement, but as part of the effort of white male doctors to professionalize, to gain control over medicine from midwives and herbalists. and also in response to a very similar moment in history that we're in now. it was a point in which there was a great deal of immigration, where native white birth rates were falling, and there was the first beginning of the suffrage and feminist movement, arguing that women shouldn't have to, that women should have a say in whether they have intercourse with their husbands. and the people who were asking the legislature to criminalize abortion were arguing that that had to be done to keep women in their place, to ensure that native wh
with a person of another race or religion. and then i had another trial after this was done in another jurisdiction that shall go unnamed, and i would say there were maybe 5 percent of the jurors, potential jurors, who had had meaningful contact with a person of a different race or ethnicity and that's really what this is about. one of my least favorite words is the word tolerance because, you know, i tolerate brussel sprouts but if you simply tolerate the diversity that is america, you are going to, you are aspiring for mediocrity. when we have, and this gets back to your question, when we have leaders that embrace diversity and that build a culture that says, you know what, if you want to compete in the global economy tomorrow, pal, you've got to embrace diversity. why does coca-cola write a brief to the united states supreme court and general motors and microsoft on issues of diversity and higher education? because they know if they want to get ahead, they've got to embrace that diversity. if they want to continue to be a fortunes 50 company, there's got to embrace diversity. si
launched an interfaith speakers bureau where we take out representatives of the 5 major religions and do the same thing and we model in front of high school and middle school students how the faiths can sit down like we are sitting here today and have conversations about our commonalities but about our differences as well. many of the comments we get from students is, wow, you guys can sit up there and talk because most of the pictures our students see are the ones that have been playing across our screens the last 2 or 3 days. we hope by challenging that we can prevent bullying and harassment we've been seeing here today. >> thank you, amina stacy is manager of communications for the los angeles giants. >> if you think about what our mission is, you probably think our mission is to win the world series every year, which hopefully this year we're on the right track, but actually our mission statement, we just went through an exercise but our mission statement has always been to enrich the community through innovation. and it's very, i am very proud of the fact that the giants have been
, we are moving in our country to maybe a state religion which says anybody who is -- who leaves homo ickes allity is biblically untrue is a pariah and fall back to the neanderthal days and we're forcing a religious belief on the catholics and muslims and all these religious groups who happen to believe that homosexuality is inappropriate. you should be able to believe what you want to believe but i don't think the government should force a religion on to a nation of people where we have so held, cling to our idea of religious freedom. someone told me -- this is a high level person, heads up a think texas -- that george southerlies funded an organization that is going into churches to tape sermons for the fact that going forward -- i believe section 501(c)(3) but the bob jones university lost its tax exemption because they had a policy against interracial marriage, and that was against public policy. so what this section of the irs says, 501, if you are against public policy, your tax exemption will be gone. so the belief is that -- that's may sound con pierer toal -- they want to get
brainwashing we do in positive ways. we tell them to eat with a fork and knife and if you believe in religion and if you think of something good you take your kids to church and you teach them positive things, etc. but you teach them bad things, too. as you see this, there is obviously no way in the world your kids would california say say california. he couldn't tell if there was a black or white person. >> i have a similar reaction to todd. when we see adults spouting off hateful things, we don't have any sort of compassion for them whereas i look at this kid and i think, he has no hope. he's being raised with this hateful message. of course he's going to most likely turn into a very hateful person. i think it might change the way i talk to someone who is deeply racist or sexist in any sort of way. >> cenk: it goes to insecurity and how they were raised, but we don't know. i would like to find the kid. you don't have to go in that direction, but it predisposes you. but jayar, it creates sympathy for the racist. >> this is what you would hope to happen, as hermella said, when you see someone
of religion despite religious heritage and religious heritage, most elite academia, they don't present the free enterprise side of economics. they're too keynesian and claw the socialist. "national review" -- rusher agreed with all that, but the greater affinity with buckley can be seen in buckley and his brother's 1954 book mccarthy and his enemies in which they say mccarty has been a little too rough, made some errors of judgment, but that cause is really important and he is being treated unfairly. that is exactly where rusher is in the years when he turns from generic young republican republicanism to hard movement conservatism. there was a bit of a conservative movement before buckley founded "national review" in 1955 but it was disorganized, the polite term might be a entrepreneur real, individualistic. whitaker chambers had another way of describing it, like people popping out like rabbits, never knew where they were coming from or where they were going. you might see this today now and then. rusher is thrilled to hear there is going to be a conservative weekly magazine. when he
tradition kept alive in the vatican walls and it has turned this faith into a third world religion. do you see any connection between a vow of celibacy, put in place in 1100 ad so priests could not leave wealth to their kids, in this unhealthy behavior that we don't see manifested in religious that don't have this celabicy rule. >> you're right. the problems with the celibacy rule many believe that the sexually troubled catholic teens and young men who have bizarre scary, sexual urges they believe that celibacy is a gift from god and if they pledge themselves to a life to god and in church they will be suppressed of these urges. that's are a nice hope but the practical reality is that many instances the reverse plays out. when you restrict your pool of potential ministers to only men who have promised to be celibate you're bound to attract less than healthy individuals and you're going to create situations in which many, many men, if no one can have sex of any sort, then many men will have a sexual secret. and if you have a sexual secret you're not going to rat out priests who are abusing
does not mean you believe -- e.b. religious on sunday are private. we have privatized religion to such a great extent. in some of us may be obsessed about this issue, but we talked about freedom and religious freedom and a conscience. my sense is most of america has no idea what we are talking about. we have different senses of what he freedom is. maybe it means increased access to contraception. how do we get a common vocabulary again? >> on the freedom of conscience and religious freedom -- religious liberty peas, i think the left feared that percolating which is what they turned it into an argument. i have to make it more here in now, one that affects more of my base voters. i think if we learn to start each sentence with a question which is, is it fair that the government -- fill in the blank with almost anything you want. take your money and taxes, tell you cannot worship your god. you cannot send your kids to a better school. is it fear the government tells you that you cannot run that business? is it fair that the government -- what they do without saying it -- i really
. but they are, they separate their politics from their religion. and you really see ton the streetsment i men in many neighborhoods, and certainly in tel aviv people dress just as they do in the states. but there are a lot of neighborhoods and especially up here in jerusalem you see the orthodox everywhere and men in their black hats and curls behind their ears and the women whose hair really is as covered as women in many muslim countries. and so there is a lot of resentment, especially among secular israelis about the special privileges that the orthodox and the settler movement get. everything from greater public spending, to the fact that the ultraorthodox with their young people say they are studying the torah are exempted from compulsory national military service that every other young israeli, male or female has to serve. and that is really you know, the most striking divide that i see here in israel. >> brown: so margaret, give us a flavor for what is coming next week. what are you reporting on. >> warner: jeff, we came here to look at the three big issues that newly elected president
religion and stuff but primarily about speightss. y speightss? why were spices so valuable? it wasn't just the food was terrible and all these things in the new world, and it was but all the spices, each new exotic spice was fought to have certain properties. they might make you feel a bit more randy. how should i put this? each of these new spices were the by agra of the day. that is one of the reasons this trade became so valuable and people risked their lives for these things. after the conquest and colonization the settlers made fortunes exporting drugs to europe and consuming them with this tendency as well and buy drugs i mean sugar which people consider a drug where we get rum from, definitely a drug, coffee, tobacco, tea, aphrodisiac spices. please became the development of engines for hemispheric development. vast fortunes were creat
constrained because of religion to talk to my male counterparts, and were more open to talking to me because i was a women. when one of the. goals is to win the hearts and minds, being able to communicate with the local population is critical and i have seen reports of engagement with local children and women in a way that must be much more difficult for men to do, and of course as medics serving fellow soldiers. host: the last caller run-up israeli women who served in combat in the israeli army. we want to show our viewers a list of countries allowing women in close combat roles including -- for the sake of this discussion, defying what is combat -- define what is combat. guest: the regulation was written in 1994, and according to that women were to be banned from ground combat, which was defined as engaging the enemy on the ground while being exposed to hostile fire and a high probability of direct physical conflict. it would take place on the battlefield. interestingly enough, as engagid regulation that was just rescinded -- the army regulation was different and banned women from code locat
of an old and honored religion. and what we need to do is find a way -- and this is something we have to work at -- for people to understand the degree to what that is happening and how it has become an excuse for their disenfranchisement, for being deprived of good governance, for being deprived of a good economy, jobs and opportunity. one of our missions is to not let that be an excuse. so i think carrying the banner of religious tolerance and diversity and pluralism is critical. i know we have raised that with president morsi. i've personally raised that with him. i think i was the first american to meet with him before he became -- before he even knew he was a candidate. and we talked about the need for the brother had to be able to respect the diversity of egypt. that has not happened completely as much as we would like in the constitutional process. but, as i said, that is an ongoing process and we need to work together in order to try to do it. but, senator, you've raised a central issue with respect to what is happening to politics of certain regions of the world. and it has t
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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